6th Power Analysis & Design Symposium 

Date and venue will be announced in the beginning of 2017!

Take the chance to join us for a great day packed with lectures, practical examples and demonstrations by international power supply experts. On the evening prior the symposium you are invited to join our "Open Lab" after work measuring event. 

All information about the past symposiums can be found in the table below.

5th Power Analysis & Design Symposium 2016

5th Symposium 2016 Intro

The 5th Power Analysis & Design Symposium took place on April 21st, 2016 in Eching near Munich (Germany). Also this year we organized an Open-Lab, in the afternoon prior the Symposium, where participants could use our measurement equipment live and even bring their own designs to be tested. You can download the flyer with all important information.

5th Power Analysis & Design Symposium 2016 Tabs

Analyzing Power Converter Stability of Current Sources

Analyzing Power Converter Stability of Current Sources

Analyzing Power Converter Stability of Current Sources
by Andreas Reiter - Microchip Technology

Current sources are everywhere around us. Especially LED drivers gain significant importance and are rapidly replacing other luminaries in various markets and applications. While most literature and scientific work is dealing with stability analysis of common voltage sources, little can be found on the specific aspects on how to properly apply common stability criteria to current sources. The load of a current source is an active part of the power conversion system that can hide issues with stability and common design margins.

This lecture will walk you through an entire development process from simulation to design validation, highlighting common pitfalls and introduce techniques to unravel hidden stability issues using real-world design examples.

DC-DC Efficiency improvement with high-resolution dead-time and a sensorless algorithm

DC-DC Efficiency improvement with high-resolution dead-time and a sensorless algorithm

DC-DC Efficiency improvement with high-resolution dead-time and a sensorless algorithm
by Pedro Costa - Infineon

The current growth of always connected electronic devices keeps on pushing the demand for smaller power footprints and power efficiency to the limit. Synchronous DC-DC converters are a constituent part of any electronic system, and are therefore directly linked to the optimization of the footprint, and efficiency when it comes to digital power conversion. While the efficiency of a synchronous DC-DC converter, such as a buck converter, is nonetheless dependent on several variables, being one of the major contributors is the body diode conduction losses. We will demonstrate in this presentation, how to implement an algorithm in an XM4200 ARM Cortex M4F microcontroller, that targets the minimization of body diode losses in the power switching devices.

This algorithm implemented in an ARM Cortex M4F will have low computational requirements and will take advantage of the first on the market 150 pico second high-resolution dead-time control. The algorithm follows a sensorless topology, which offers a reduced system footprint for the world of connectivity, while taking advantage of the unique combination of a high-resolution duty cycle, and a high resolution dead-time control to improve the overall efficiency of the DC-DC converter.  A complete organization of the microcontroller resources to implement the algorithm is going to be demonstrated and presented. The algorithm is used to optimize the dead-time of the converter on both ON-to-OFF and OFF-to-ON state transitions. The final results are demonstrated using the XMC4200 ARM Cortex M4F microcontroller and a DC-DC Buck Converter. The low computation algorithm will improve the converter efficiency while using the first time ever 150 pico second resolution dead-time, in more than 1% versus the same algorithm with low resolution dead-time, and in more than 3% when compared with a fixed dead-time algorithm.

Digital power controllers improve reliability and availability of DC/DC converters

Digital power controllers improve reliability and availability of DC/DC converters

Digital power controllers improve reliability and availability of DC/DC converters
by Bernhard Strzalkowski - Analog Devices GmbH

Modern digital power controllers do not only improve the power efficiency of converters, they can also enhance their reliability and availability. New features like volt-second-balance, matched cycle-by-cycle current limiting, digital current sharing and nonlinear gain control for fast transient response can only be realized by digital controllers. 

The volt-second-balance helps equalizing the current in the power transformer to avoid successive accumulation of magnetic flux, thus avoiding transformer saturation and overheating. Matched cycle-by-cycle current limiting avoids transformer imbalance during over current condition.  Digital current sharing provides accurate and EMI-robust control of converters working in parallel. The digital share bus takes a similar control approach to the analog share bus. However, the main difference is at the communication level. Each power supply outputs a digital word (rather than an analog voltage) which is proportional to the current that the power supply is delivering. The bigger the word, the bigger the current that unit is delivering to the load. Each unit senses the word that appears on the bus, and compares it to it’s own word. This comparison is performed in a bit-by-bit routine, starting with the MSB. Once a unit senses that it’s word is smaller than the word on the bus, it knows that it must increase its contribution to the system load. 

Nonlinear gain enhances the system response on fast loads transients. During a transient condition, the digital compensator acts on the error voltage and adjusts the control input to correct for the error. This may take several switching cycles, especially during a transition from DCM to CCM. In such cases, a boosted error signal aids in reducing the settling time and can even avoid an overshoot.

Filter Layout and Components for DC/DC Switching Power Converters

Filter Layout and Components for DC/DC Switching Power Converters

Filter Layout and Components for DC/DC Switching Power Converters
by Andreas Nadler - Würth Elektronik

Every product brought to the market must pass certain EMC tests. An essential design step for a proper functioning DC/DC switching converter is the selection of optimal components. In addition the PCB layout of the converter circuit and the filter circuits are critical for the EMC properties of the converter. In this lecture we will show how to calculate input and output filters for switching power converters and will present the influence of PCB layout issues, part selection and filters based on real-life EMC measurements.

Optimizing DC/DC converter dynamics via PMBus

Optimizing DC/DC converter dynamics via PMBus

Optimizing DC/DC converter dynamics via PMBus
by Bostjan Bitenc - Linear Technology Corp. (LTC)

Power management systems can be very complex these days. Many interdependent supply rails, very demanding dynamic requirements (e.g. FPGA core), space restrictions, tight cost budgets, etc. are challenging hardware engineers responsible for power supply concepts and implementations. “Digital Control“ is a key topic since many years and possible advantages have been widely discussed, but one important aspect mostly remains unsaid, it means adding a lot of complexity.

This presentation gives a quick overview on LTC´s Power System Management (PSM) concept which combines proven technology (e.g. fast analog control loops with current/voltage mode control and non-linear slope compensation) with add-on digital features. It then focuses on a new PSM buck controller, the LTC3884, that offers adjustable loop compensation via PMBus. Simulations and Bode 100 measurements will be used to visualize how this feature can be used to easily optimize dynamic performance of a DC/DC converter.

Seminar Partners

4th Power Analysis & Design Symposium 2015

4th Symposium 2015 Intro

The 4th Symposium took place on May 6th 2015 in Eching near Munich (Germany). In 2015 we did organize the first time an Open-Lab event where participants could use our measurement equipment live and even bring their own designs to be tested. You can download the flyer with all important information.

Topics Harmonica

Adaptive Software Slope Compensation in Digital Peak Current Mode Controlled Power Converters

Adaptive Software Slope Compensation in Digital Peak Current Mode Controlled Power Converters

Adaptive Software Slope Compensation in Digital Peak Current Mode Controlled Power Converters
by Andreas Reiter (Microchip)

Early DSP-based power converters were mostly used to “imitate” proven analog compensation filters in combination with programmability and design flexibility. These devices were able to support different converter types and topologies and enabled designers to quickly respond to custom specific requirements with no or very little re-engineering and qualification efforts.

However, Digital Control is much more than just software-based analog circuit emulation. With increasing acceptance and experience in various applications and markets, digital control has entered a new level of non-linear control. Over the years adaptive and predictive control methods have been developed to increase efficiency, performance and reliability simultaneously.

This lecture introduces one key example of how the flexibility of digital control loops can help to improve the total performance and bypass/solve major common design tradeoffs in peak current mode controlled power converters using Adaptive Software Slope Compensation (ASSC). The basic concept, implementation and test results will be discussed and verified using OMICRON Lab’s Bode 100.

A short introduction to loop gain measurements

A short introduction to loop gain measurements

A short introduction to loop gain measurements
by Florian Hämmerle (OMICRON Lab)

The loop gain measurement is a standard method to verify the control loop stability of voltage regulators and switching power supplies. However, like for all measurements certain requirements and parameters need to be met to ensure correct and trustworthy results. The choice of the injection point for example is critical and defines the limits of the voltage loop gain measurement. Furthermore the signal level of the injected signal is crucial.

This lecture focuses on the loop gain measurement method and its application using the Vector Network Analyzer Bode 100.  In addition to the voltage loop gain measurement two additional measurement methods are outlined that can provide results even when no suitable injection point for the voltage loop gain measurement is available.

Computer Generated Coefficients for Stable Digital Power Supply Design

Computer Generated Coefficients for Stable Digital Power Supply Design
by Dr. Ali Shirsavar (Biricha Digital Power)

According to the latest market research, the digital power phenomenon is about to hit us like thunder.

Most larger corporations in the power industry have already embraced this new technology, and are introducing products with performances unimaginable only a few years ago. New efficiency regulations are also increasingly forcing companies to swallow the digital power pill as such high performances are seldom possible with simple analog solutions. Whilst many medium to small size companies are aware of the changing landscape of the power market, they do not have the man power nor the resources to invest in training their engineers in this new technology.  

This session is aimed at addressing the above issue. The most challenging part of a digital power design is the discrete time control loop coefficient calculations. In this technical session we will discuss this process in detail and highlight the calculations that you need to make in order to design a stable digital control loop. Having covered the foundation of digital power control loop design in detail, we will then introduce arguably the world's most sophisticated digital power supply design software which automatically calculates the control loop coefficients for the Infineon, Microchip and Texas Instruments range of microprocessors. The session concludes with live demonstration of the digital power control loop that we designed during the session, its real life loop measurement and direct comparison with the theory.

 

Designing a filter is not as easy as it seems to be

Designing a filter is not as easy as it seems to be

Designing a filter is not as easy as it seems to be
by Markus Schubert (Würth Elektronik)

The gap between calculation and the real world can be huge. This especially applies for the world of electronics. Deviations between theoretical filter design and the achieved performance of the filter can be caused by many reasons. For example unknown parasitics of the used discrete components or direct crosstalk in the printed circuit board layout can strongly influence the over-all filter characteristic.

So, there are a view things to know, to get the filter working as it should. This presentation outlines common pitfalls and helps to remember all these effects and to avoid mistakes in future designs.

EMI Debugging with Digital Oscilloscopes - on the design engineer's desk

EMI Debugging with Digital Oscilloscopes - on the design engineer's desk

EMI Debugging with Digital Oscilloscopes - on the design engineer's desk
by Markus Herdin (Rohde & Schwarz)

Debugging electromagnetic interference (EMI) is a challenging task. Identifying and mitigating the source(s) of unwanted emissions is often iterative and time consuming, multiple test rounds at an EMC laboratory costly.

The high sensitivity and powerful spectrum analysis capabilities of the Rohde & Schwarz digital oscilloscopes RTE and RTO allow to do a lot of the analysis already in the lab. Using near-field probes and coupling networks an R&D engineer can identify hot spots and do pre-qualification before going to the EMC test house. EMI reduction measures can easily be tested. This session gives an overview on the EMI debugging capabilities of the Rohde & Schwarz RTE and RTO oscilloscopes as well as an hands-on guide how to approach the problem.

LTspice - Your Virtual SMPS Laboratory

LTspice - Your Virtual SMPS Laboratory

LTspice - Your Virtual SMPS Laboratory
by Bostjan Bitenc (Linear Technology)

In today´s world, R&D engineers face shorter and shorter design cycles, high cost/innovation pressure and increased design complexity. Computer-aided design is essential to keep pace with constantly growing requirements. LTspice is the world´s most popular power electronics simulator. It aims to simplify power supply design and verification tasks, leaving more time for creativity and innovation. 

This session gives a comprehensive overview about the various aspects of SMPS design (topology selection, impact of parasitics/layout, bode/impedance analysis, thermal simulation, etc) that can be covered with LTspice. 

The 3-port impedance measurement technique and its application in power supply testing

The 3-port impedance measurement technique and its application in power supply testing

The 3-port impedance measurement technique and its application in power supply testing
by Steven M. Sandler (Picotest),
presented by Bernhard Baumgartner (OMICRON Lab)

Many engineers are familiar with the 1-port reflection impedance measurement and the 2-port shunt thru measurement.  The former is ideal for measuring impedance in the range of 1 ? to a few k?’s while the latter is ideal for measuring from 1 m? to a few ?’s.  

The 3-port measurement can be used to measure from a few m?’s to a few k?’s and is also ideal for measuring the input impedance of switching power supplies and other system level circuits. 

This presentation provides an introduction as well as detailed instructions for the setup, calibration and examples using the 3-port impedance measurement.

In 2015 again important players of the industry did support our symposium with presentations or demos.

3rd Power Analysis & Design Symposium 2014

3rd Symposum 2014 Intro

The 3rd Power Analysis & Design Symposium took place on May 15th 2014 in Eching near Munich (Germany). Feel free to download the symposium flyer.

Seminar Topics

Power Integrity - measuring, optimization and troubleshooting power related issues

Power Integrity - measuring, optimization and
troubleshooting power related issues

Power Integrity - measuring, optimization and troubleshooting power related issues
by Steven M. Sandler (Picotest)

Learn about measurement philosophy, test equipment requirements, and simple measurement techniques for obtaining high fidelity measurements. This session addresses the benefits of non-invasive, in-system measurements and the use of indirect measurements to identify, assess and troubleshoot system level problems. While the session includes all system related measurements and domains, you will learn why the frequency domain is generally preferred and how to get the best fidelity when measuring in the time domain.

Design and measurement of stable opto-isolated power supplies

Design and measurement of stable opto-isolated power supplies

Design and measurement of stable opto-isolated power supplies
by Dr. Ali Shirsavar (Biricha Digital Power)

In this session, Dr. Shirsavar will explain how to design a stable opto-isolated control loop for an isolated power supply. The techniques taught are applicable to both analog and digital power supplies. In particular, the frequency response of the opto-isolator and its impact on the power supply’s control loop will be studied.The session will conclude with a real-life measurement of an opto-isolator within a power supply using aBode 100 VNA.

Control loop design and practical verification in DC/DC converter applications

Control loop design and practical verification in
DC/DC converter applications

Control loop design and practical verification in DC/DC converter applications
by U. Schwalbe, M. Schilling, T. Reimann  (TU Ilmenau)

Many currently used research concepts deal with the control loop design of special converter topologies or special control structures. Therefore, power electronic design engineers, it is difficult to find a good design methodology and achieve an optimized controller design quickly. The authors present the development of a simple model-based design methodology for DC/DC converters using the Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE). Frequency and time domain simulation models will be used for an efficient loop design. In addition, a short practical control loop design guide using the SPICE simulation tool and the vector network analyzer Bode 100 is presented. The complete control loop design will be shown on a fly-back converter prototype.

Real-Life EMC Filter Design and Analysis

Real-Life EMC Filter Design and Analysis

Real-Life EMC Filter Design and Analysis
by Ralf Negele (Negal Engineering)

A working EMC filter is one of the key requirements to ensure stable operation of power supplies. Classical design approaches work either with ideal components or SPICE models. In this lecture, a new method is introduced that takes into consideration the real-life characteristics of the actually used components right from the beginning.

8 design tips for correct power inductor selection

8 design tips for correct power inductor selection

8 design tips for correct power inductor selection
by Markus Schubert (Würth Elektronik)

To ensure the proper functioning of a power supply in the field, the selection of the correct power inductor is essential. In this lecture, it is shown how important it is to consider the core material, the switching frequency as well as inductor currents and losses during design process and component selection.

Taking advantage of high resolution PWM

Taking advantage of high resolution PWM

Taking advantage of high resolution PWM
by Pablo Yelamos (Infineon)

The growing demand in terms of conversion efficiency and time to market has led the power control world to adopt digital control techniques. Not only a digital control technique offers better flexibility in terms of adaption to newly created topologies, but will also offer a better efficiency over different operating conditions, such as temperature and fabrication process. We will demonstrate how the XMC4000 microcontroller together with a powerful ARM® Cortex™-M4 processor can be used to control a 5 MHz high switching frequency buck converter – taking advantages of the 150 picosecond PWM resolution – and give examples of how the resources can be arranged to address several other power conversion topologies.

Design & verification challenges in fully digital, non-linear control systems

Design & verification challenges in fully digital,
non-linear control systems

Design & verification challenges in fully digital, non-linear control systems
by Andy Reiter (Microchip Technology)

Early DSP-based power converters were mostly used to “imitate” proven analog compensation filters in combination with programmability and design flexibility. With increasing acceptance and experience in various applications and markets, digital control has entered an entirely new level of non-linear control. Over the years adaptive and predictive control methods have been developed to increase efficiency, performance and reliability simultaneously. This lecture introduces the concept of basic non-linear control concepts and focuses on verification methods for Adaptive Gain Control (AGC).

In 2014 the following companies strongly supported the OMICRON Lab Power Analysis and Design Symposium:

2nd Power Analysis & Design Symposium 2013

2nd Symposium Intro

The 2nd Symposium took place on May 22nd 2013 in Klaus (Austria). Feel free to download the symposium flyer.

2nd Symposium 2014 Tabs

Seminar Topics

Characterizing and troubleshooting distributed power systems

Characterizing and troubleshooting distributed
power systems

Characterizing and troubleshooting distributed power systems
by Steven M. Sandler (Picotest)

This session addresses some of the common distributed power system issues and how to perform high fidelity in-system measurements, using three domains to identify and troubleshoot problems utilizing non-invasive testing methods. Impedance measurement, the key to assessing and optimizing PDNs (Power Distribution Networks) is explored in-depth. We will show how to determine and interpret the stability margin of control loops, as well as filter/converter combinations using non-invasive single port and two port measurements.

Digital Power De-Mystified from DC/DC to Digital PFC

Digital Power De-Mystified from DC/DC to
Digital PFC

Digital Power De-Mystified from DC/DC to Digital PFC
by Dr. Ali Shirsavar (Biricha Digital Power)

This session aims to inform the participants of the real engineering benefits as well as the practical challenges of digital power thus enabling them to choose the most suitable power management solution for their application. We will present numerous real life examples and a case study on Digital PFC (Power Factor Correction). The session concludes with a live demonstration of an auto-tuning stable digital DC/DC converter.

SMPS Bode Analysis Using LTspice

SMPS Bode Analysis Using LTspice

SMPS Bode Analysis Using LTspice
by Bostjan Bitenc (Linear Technology)

In this session we show how a frequency domain simulation of a SMPS can be obtained from transient simulation data. A special focus will be laid on methods to assess the correctness of the simulation results. The session closes with practical demonstrations and the comparison of simulation examples with real world measurements.

Seminar Partners

Picotest Logo

Linear Logo

Biricha Logo

AEI Logo

Teledyne Logo

1st Power Analysis & Design Symposium 2011

1st Seminar Intro

Our first seminar took place on May 3rd 2011 in Klaus (Austria), on October 19th 2011 in Duisburg, Germany and on 21st October 2011 in Munich, Germany.
Please feel free to download the flyer with furthers details.

1st Seminar Tabs

Seminar Topics

Advanced Power Measurements

Advanced Power Measurements

Advanced Power Measurements
by Steven M. Sandler (Picotest)


No access to the feedback loop? No problem!
By performing non-invasive phase margin measurements, you can determine the stability of a power supply non-invasively during operation.

How small is small signal?
Choosing the right signal level is essential for getting the correct phase margin and gain margin of your power supply.

You need more bandwidth than you think.
Sometimes instabilities of power supplies arise at frequencies you never planned to look at. By analyzing a simple LDO, we will demonstrate how important bandwidth for your measurements is.

Choose the right injection point.
For the analysis of your power supply, it is important to make sure that you inject your signal at the right position inside the control loop. By choosing the correct injection point, you can significantly improve the quality of your measurement results.

Can PSRR and Reverse Rejection be measured?
Yes, these can be measured and yes, these are important parameters you should look at when working in systems where one supply voltage feeds several DC/DC converters.

 

Designing stable digital power supplies

Designing stable digital power supplies

Designing stable digital power supplies
by Dr. Ali Shirsavar (Biricha Digital Power)

Designing digital compensators is surprisingly easy. In this session you will learn how to design a stable digital controller. Starting from a stable analog compensator with poles and zeros in continuous time, we will convert this into a digital controller using bi-linear transform. Practical issues such as the effects of sampling and reconstruction on the phase margin will also be discussed. The complete design will be implemented on a TI C2000 MCU and the session concludes with practical loop measurement of our digital power supply.

Seminar Partners

Biricha Logo

Picotest Logo

Texas Instruments Logo